Adaptive ecology
This page describes the organizational forces that limit change.  It explains how to overcome them when necessary. 

Power& tradition holding back progress
This page uses an example to illustrate how:
  • A business can gain focus from targeting key customers,
  • Business planning activities performed by the whole organization can build awareness, empowerment and coherence. 
  • A program approach can ensure strategic alignment. 
Be responsive to market dynamics
This page uses the example of HP's printer organization freeing itself from its organizational constraints to sell a printer targeted at the IBM pc user. 
The constraints are described. 
The techniques to overcome them are implied. 
Overcome reactionaries
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The adaptive management of life

Summary
E. O. Wilson reviews the effect of man on the natural world to date and explains how the two systems can coexist most effectively. 
The future of life
In the first part of E. O. Wilson's book 'The future of life' he celebrates the diversity of life in the different niches found on Earth.  He then presents a problem for Humanity and the Biosphere that sustains us.   For each of the eight billion people soon to be in the world to reach present U.S. levels of consumption will require five planet Earths.  Humanity is currently on a course of erasing the last of the natural environments.  He writes 'the immediate future is usefully conceived as a bottleneck.  Science and technology, combined with a lack of self-understanding and a Paleolithic obstinacy, brought us to where we are today'. 

Wilson explains that China will be the epicenter of population stress with a 700 million increase in population crammed in to the basins of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers.  That is an area equal to the eastern U.S. The additional population will have nowhere else to go.  It is predicted to induce food and water shortages, and that's without the implications of the likely upward mobility of life style. 

More efficient food sources and better water conservation will be required if the bottleneck is to be circumvented. 

One often used strategy for coping is for humans to invade the remaining Biosphere.  Wilson argues that this strategy is very short-sited.  The potential to leverage phenomena and molecular devices, created by
This page reviews the implications of selection, variation and heredity in a complex adaptive system (CAS).  The mechanism and its emergence are discussed. 
evolution
over a billion years, and tailored to operate efficiently in the many niches found on Earth, is vast, and would be lost.  Further the Biosphere is made up of a series of interconnected hubs where most of the flora and fauna of the world live.  As we invade the hubs, such as great forests, break them up and disconnect them from one another, the impact is massive.  The life forms at the top of the pyramid rapidly collapse.  Wilson argues that we must conserve these key hubs of the Biosphere so that we may leverage its treasures sustainably and effectively. 

The last part of Wilson's book looks at ways that the biosphere is currently being conserved.  Developing the idea that the Biosphere is a network of small to large hubs conservation efforts aim to initially select a few key hubs and leverage philanthropy to compete with economic agents' intent on unsustainably capturing the resources.  It turns out that many of the hubs are of limited commercial value.  The economic agents can't compete with the prices paid by NGO is non governmental organization.  s using donated funds.  Additionally the countries where the hubs reside are trained and supported in strategies that leverage the living systems as tourist attractions, sustainable sources of pharmaceuticals and as sources of design ideas.  The strategy encourages the indigenous peoples and their life styles to be maintained. 

Still some key hubs of the Biosphere are in regions where the human populations are growing rapidly. 

The application of
This page introduces the complex adaptive system (CAS) theory frame.  The theory is positioned relative to the natural sciences.  It catalogs the laws and strategies which underpin the operation of systems that are based on the interaction of emergent agents. 
John Holland's framework for representing complexity is outlined.  Links to other key aspects of CAS theory discussed at the site are presented. 
CAS theory
represents the world as a set of
This page discusses the mechanisms and effects of emergence underpinning any complex adaptive system (CAS).  Key research is reviewed. 
emergent
niches. 
Plans are interpreted and implemented by agents.  This page discusses the properties of agents in a complex adaptive system (CAS). 
It then presents examples of agents in different CAS.  The examples include a computer program where modeling and actions are performed by software agents.  These software agents are aggregates. 
The participation of agents in flows is introduced and some implications of this are outlined. 
Adaptive agents
naturally form into
This page discusses the effect of the network on the agents participating in a complex adaptive system (CAS).  Small world and scale free networks are considered. 
networks
with key hubs developing.  A strategy focused initially on the key hubs of the Biosphere and then expanding from there is most likely to succeed.  Transforming wilderness regions into economically beneficial adaptive agents allows local
This page looks at schematic structures and their uses.  It discusses a number of examples:
  • Schematic ideas are recombined in creativity. 
  • Similarly designers take ideas and rules about materials and components and combine them. 
  • Schematic Recipes help to standardize operations. 
  • Modular components are combined into strategies for use in business plans and business models. 

As a working example it presents part of the contents and schematic details from the Adaptive Web Framework (AWF)'s operational plan. 

Finally it includes a section presenting our formal representation of schematic goals. 
Each goal has a series of associated complex adaptive system (CAS) strategy strings. 
These goals plus strings are detailed for various chess and business examples. 
strategies
to develop which when successful tend to create
This page reviews the inhibiting effect of the value delivery system on the expression of new phenotypic effects within an agent. 
extended alignment


The opportunity for humanity to leverage its
Matt Ridley demonstrates the creative effect of man on the World. He highlights:
  • A list of preconditions resulting in
  • Additional niche capture & more free time 
  • Building a network to interconnect memes processes & tools which
  • Enabling inter-generational transfers
  • Innovations that help reduce environmental stress even as they leverage fossil fuels

creativity
, and
Tools and the businesses that produce them have evolved dramatically.  W Brian Arthur shows how this occurred.
technological prowess
to minimize its impact on the natural world while maximizing the benefits obtained from it should help match the
Agents can manage uncertainty by limiting their commitments of resources until the environment contains signals strongly correlated with the required scenario.  This page explains how agents can use Shewhart cycles and SWOT processes to do this. 
commitments and risk
.  The strategies which have been used broadly include:
It is clear that the bottleneck is a huge issue.  Wilson's strategies are adaptive, locally focused and aligned with sustaining the most important regions of the Biosphere.  Wilson makes it evident that the currently opposing economic forces and funding required to achieve success are huge challenges.  Still Wilson's strategies should result in the emergence of a self-sustaining network of ecological agents benefiting every life on Earth.  


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This page looks at schematic structures and their uses.  It discusses a number of examples:
  • Schematic ideas are recombined in creativity. 
  • Similarly designers take ideas and rules about materials and components and combine them. 
  • Schematic Recipes help to standardize operations. 
  • Modular components are combined into strategies for use in business plans and business models. 

As a working example it presents part of the contents and schematic details from the Adaptive Web Framework (AWF)'s operational plan. 

Finally it includes a section presenting our formal representation of schematic goals. 
Each goal has a series of associated complex adaptive system (CAS) strategy strings. 
These goals plus strings are detailed for various chess and business examples. 
Strategy
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This page uses an example to illustrate how:
  • A business can gain focus from targeting key customers,
  • Business planning activities performed by the whole organization can build awareness, empowerment and coherence. 
  • A program approach can ensure strategic alignment. 
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