Evolutionary amplifier
This page describes the organizational forces that limit change.  It explains how to overcome them when necessary. 

Power& tradition holding back progress
This page uses an example to illustrate how:
  • A business can gain focus from targeting key customers,
  • Business planning activities performed by the whole organization can build awareness, empowerment and coherence. 
  • A program approach can ensure strategic alignment. 
Be responsive to market dynamics
This page uses the example of HP's printer organization freeing itself from its organizational constraints to sell a printer targeted at the IBM pc user. 
The constraints are described. 
The techniques to overcome them are implied. 
Overcome reactionaries
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Powerful force of evolutionary amplifiers

Summary
This page reviews the strategy of setting up an arms race, in a war where both sides use the strategy of development and use of advanced weapon systems to gain an advantage, each advance induces the other side to respond with its own asymmetric advances.  Neither side will necessarily gain the upper hand in which case the weapon systems themselves advance rapidly with little direct benefit for the combatants. 
.  At its core this strategy depends on being able to alter, or take advantage of an alteration in, the
Plans emerge in complex adaptive systems (CAS) to provide the instructions that agents use to perform actions.  The component architecture and structure of the plans is reviewed. 
genome
or equivalent.  The situation is illustrated with examples from biology, high tech and politics. 
Introduction
Certain competitive situations create positive feedback for all competitors; an arms race, in a war where both sides use the strategy of development and use of advanced weapon systems to gain an advantage, each advance induces the other side to respond with its own asymmetric advances.  Neither side will necessarily gain the upper hand in which case the weapon systems themselves advance rapidly with little direct benefit for the combatants. 
develops. Once started these dynamic structures can be very persistent. 

When one set of
Plans are interpreted and implemented by agents.  This page discusses the properties of agents in a complex adaptive system (CAS). 
It then presents examples of agents in different CAS.  The examples include a computer program where modeling and actions are performed by software agents.  These software agents are aggregates. 
The participation of agents in flows is introduced and some implications of this are outlined. 
agents
can gain a significant benefit at little cost from inducing some other set of agents to perform an action, from which the induced agents need only marginally benefit (relative to their niche competitors) the effect is to generate a reinforcing loop.  If ways are found to create a sustainable pool of induced agents at low cost an amplifier
This page discusses the mechanisms and effects of emergence underpinning any complex adaptive system (CAS).  Key research is reviewed. 
emerges
.  If the benefits of the situation improve the relative
Plans change in complex adaptive systems (CAS) due to the action of genetic operations such as mutation, splitting and recombination.  The nature of the operations is described. 
reproductive success
of all participants the
Plans emerge in complex adaptive systems (CAS) to provide the instructions that agents use to perform actions.  The component architecture and structure of the plans is reviewed. 
schematic pool
will reflect the situation and maintain the strategy within its plans. 

In biology the situation is seen in a variety of scenarios:

Law makers have the tools to induce many evolutionary amplifiers. 

The computer operating system provides
Plans emerge in complex adaptive systems (CAS) to provide the instructions that agents use to perform actions.  The component architecture and structure of the plans is reviewed. 
programs (memetic action streams)
with capabilities
Plans change in complex adaptive systems (CAS) due to the action of genetic operations such as mutation, splitting and recombination.  The nature of the operations is described. 
inverted
from the applications.  With a choice of operating systems 1990
Plans are interpreted and implemented by agents.  This page discusses the properties of agents in a complex adaptive system (CAS). 
It then presents examples of agents in different CAS.  The examples include a computer program where modeling and actions are performed by software agents.  These software agents are aggregates. 
The participation of agents in flows is introduced and some implications of this are outlined. 
computer application designers
had to select which operating system to leverage.  The decision was really about which computing platform would be purchased by the target customers of the application.  Once applications, customer base and platform converged the decision became obvious.  The coupling of the platform and the operating system left most of the power (benefits) in the hands of the operating system supplier.  Application developers accepted the lack of power to obtain the benefit of access to the customer base and to leverage the operation system services.  With the advent of cloud computing this evolutionary amplifier has been weakened since the customer base and computing platform are independent allowing the designers the power to chose which operating system to select. 

In the business equivalent of the parasite-host amplifier powerful competitors are most likely to be threatened by
This page reviews Christensen's disruption of a complex adaptive system (CAS).  The mechanism is discussed with examples from biology and business. 
disruption
from within their expanded eco-net. 

Initially disconnected low cost business networks with low feature products will become part of the business eco-system and then capture the low profit markets.  A key business level response, described by Christensen in the Innovator's Solution is to create new high profit niche market solutions while the business is still cash generating and before it becomes trapped in a cycle of market retreat. 

The strategy was executed by Hewlett-Packard in its struggles to cope with customers influenced by Dell's offerings.  Hewlett-Packard's potential for success was increased since they leveraged new markets and shifting needs while Dell's strategy and target market needs encouraged it to ignore the changes. 

In each case a memetic structure has stabilized and persisted benefits to two interacting populations through an evolved process of selection. 




















































































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integrating quality appropriate for each market
 
This page looks at schematic structures and their uses.  It discusses a number of examples:
  • Schematic ideas are recombined in creativity. 
  • Similarly designers take ideas and rules about materials and components and combine them. 
  • Schematic Recipes help to standardize operations. 
  • Modular components are combined into strategies for use in business plans and business models. 

As a working example it presents part of the contents and schematic details from the Adaptive Web Framework (AWF)'s operational plan. 

Finally it includes a section presenting our formal representation of schematic goals. 
Each goal has a series of associated complex adaptive system (CAS) strategy strings. 
These goals plus strings are detailed for various chess and business examples. 
Strategy
| Design |
This page uses an example to illustrate how:
  • A business can gain focus from targeting key customers,
  • Business planning activities performed by the whole organization can build awareness, empowerment and coherence. 
  • A program approach can ensure strategic alignment. 
Program Management
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