Guardian morality
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Morality maintaining cooperation

Summary
This page reviews the strategy of collective punishment of
Plans are interpreted and implemented by agents.  This page discusses the properties of agents in a complex adaptive system (CAS). 
It then presents examples of agents in different CAS.  The examples include a computer program where modeling and actions are performed by software agents.  These software agents are aggregates. 
The participation of agents in flows is introduced and some implications of this are outlined. 
agents
who game agreements in a complex adaptive system (
This page introduces the complex adaptive system (CAS) theory frame.  The theory is positioned relative to the natural sciences.  It catalogs the laws and strategies which underpin the operation of systems that are based on the interaction of emergent agents. 
John Holland's framework for representing complexity is outlined.  Links to other key aspects of CAS theory discussed at the site are presented. 
CAS
).  The mechanism and its consequences are discussed. 
Introduction
Cooperative activities and especially reciprocal benefits another organism at a cost to the behaver.  It is differentiated from kin altruism, by Williams and Trivers, since it can apply between unrelated individuals.  It can be induced by natural selection when there is mutual survival benefit in group activities and cheating can be detected and discouraged.  Humans, leveraging the cognitive niche, can particularly easily, build an evolved amplifier, through sharing information at little cost and significant benefit.  But African savanna hunters similarly gain from sharing large game meat with other un-related altruistic group members since the meat would otherwise spoil before it could be eaten. 
altruism benefits another organism at a cost to the behaver.  It is differentiated from kin altruism, by Williams and Trivers, since it can apply between unrelated individuals.  It can be induced by natural selection when there is mutual survival benefit in group activities and cheating can be detected and discouraged.  Humans, leveraging the cognitive niche, can particularly easily, build an evolved amplifier, through sharing information at little cost and significant benefit.  But African savanna hunters similarly gain from sharing large game meat with other un-related altruistic group members since the meat would otherwise spoil before it could be eaten. 
appear to present the 'selfish gene' model of schematic fitness with problems.  Group fitness appears significant in high value environments where
This page reviews the strategy of bundling multiple products within a single offer in a complex adaptive system (CAS).  The mechanism is discussed with examples from biology and business. 
bundling
can occur. 

While insect '
E. O. Wilson & Bert Holldobler illustrate how bundled cooperative strategies can take hold.  Various social insects have developed strategies which have allowed them to capture the most valuable available niches.  Like humans they invest in specialization and cooperate to subdue larger, well equipped competitors. 
superorganisms
' have diploid, describes a cell with two sets of schematic material.  A different set can come from each parent in sexual reproduction. 
Plans emerge in complex adaptive systems (CAS) to provide the instructions that agents use to perform actions.  The component architecture and structure of the plans is reviewed. 
schematic 'databases'
allowing selfish strategies to promote cooperation among kin, human coalitions are not always familial.  Group selection could be operating.  But its failure to provide a direct mechanism to schematically record improved fitness strategies, suggests an
Rather than oppose the direct thrust of some environmental flow agents can improve their effectiveness with indirect responses.  This page explains how agents are architected to do this and discusses some examples of how it can be done. 
indirect
process supporting cooperative mental strategies based on underlying genetic structures captured by
This page reviews the implications of selection, variation and heredity in a complex adaptive system (CAS).  The mechanism and its emergence are discussed. 
natural selection
.  Cooperation collapses if a significant number of the group game the system. 

Two aspects of cooperative group dynamics support high fitness:
  1. Increased benefits for all from repeated cooperative activities.  When a beneficial activity is an
    This page reviews the catalytic impact of infrastructure on the expression of phenotypic effects by an agent.  The infrastructure reduces the cost the agent must pay to perform the selected action.  The catalysis is enhanced by positive returns. 
    infrastructure amplifier
    , repeated operation will bring increased benefits to group members. 
  2. Moralistic strategies has been studied by psychologist Paul Rozin.  He showed that once the switch turns on key actions are constrained by fundamental moral senses.  These constraints are implemented by the medial frontal lobes.  When the switch is disabled utilitarian logic, supported in the dorsolateral frontal lobes will be used to make decisions.  The conflict between the two areas is registered in the anterior cingulate cortex.  These FMRI studies confirm philosopher and neuro-scientist Joshua Greene's argument that evolution equipped people with a revulsion of manhandling an innocent person. 
    within a major subgroup of the cooperative group.  These guardian, Keirsey, Myers-Briggs and Aristotle have noted a personality segmentation reflecting individual/group orientation and theory/practice orientation.  Keirsey named the four segments: Rational (i, t), Idealist (g, t), Guardian (g, p) and Artisan (i, p).  Geoffrey Moore's chasm crossing strategy can be seen to leverage this personality segmentation. 
    Plans are interpreted and implemented by agents.  This page discusses the properties of agents in a complex adaptive system (CAS). 
    It then presents examples of agents in different CAS.  The examples include a computer program where modeling and actions are performed by software agents.  These software agents are aggregates. 
    The participation of agents in flows is introduced and some implications of this are outlined. 
    agents
    punish group members who appear to be breaking their moral senses is psychologist Jonathan Haidt's classification of primary themes that are drivers of human moral decision making.  Anthrapolagists have identified the themes across cultures.  Haidt concludes people don't engage in moral reasoning, but moral rationalization.  As Steven Pinker explains in The Moral Instinct, once the moral decision switch is active these themes will gain precedence.  They include:
    • Harm
    • Fairness
    • Community
    • Authority
    • Purity; but what acts are associated with each theme is culturally learned.  For example smoking can be taught to be viewed as a fun pleasure or associated with harm and so morally reprehensible. 
    .  Cosmides identified the evolved cheater detector.  The risk of detection and punishment makes it more effective to cooperate in the short term.  Improved fitness of the individuals in the group allows selection to sustain an
    This page reviews the strategy of setting up an arms race.  At its core this strategy depends on being able to alter, or take advantage of an alteration in, the genome or equivalent.  The situation is illustrated with examples from biology, high tech and politics. 
    evolutionary amplifier
    .  Trivers argues that reciprocal altruism drives the emotions are low level agents distributed across the brain and body which associate, via the amygdala and rich club hubs, important environmental signals with encoded high speed sensors, and distributed programs of action to model: predict, prioritize guidance signals, select and respond effectively, coherently and rapidly to the initial signal.  The majority of emotion centered brain regions interface to the midbrain through the hypothalamus.  The most accessible signs of emotions are the hard to control and universal facial expressions.  Emotions provide prioritization for conscious access given that an animal has only one body, but possibly many cells, with which to achieve its highest level goals.  Because of this emotions clash with group goals and are disparaged by the powerful.  Evolutionary psychology argues evolution shaped human emotions during the long period of hunter-gatherer existence in the African savanna.  Human emotions are universal and include: Anger, Appreciation of natural beauty, Disgust, Fear, Gratitude, Grief, Guilt, Happiness, Honor, Jealousy, Liking, Love, Rage, Romantic love, Lust for revenge, Passion, Sadness, Self-control, Shame, Sympathy, Surprise; and the sham emotions and distrust induced by reciprocal altruism. 
    of: liking is an emotion which initiates and maintains an altruistic partnership.  It is a willingness to offer someone a favor.  It is directed to those who appear likely to return the favor.  , anger is an emotion which protects a person who has been cheated by a supposed friend.  When the exploitation of the altruism is discovered, Steven Pinker explains, the result is a drive for moralistic aggression to hurt the cheater. 
    , gratitude is an emotion that sets the strength of the desire to reciprocate a favor based on the costs and benefits of the earlier gift.  When a favor helps a lot and is costly to the giver we are very grateful.  , sympathy is an emotion, the desire to help those in need.  Steven Pinker suggests it may develop into a sham emotion to earn gratitide. 
    , guilt is an emotion which alerts us to the risk of cheating on a friend. 
    and shame is an emotional reaction to being discovered cheating on a friend. 
    ; the sham emotions are natural selection's response to peoples reactions to the emotions of reciprocal altruism: Liking, Anger, Gratitude, Sympathy, Guilt and Shame.  Sham emotions mimic people's responses to the real emotions to take advantage of the reactions.  This escalation drives the evolution of trust and distrust. 
    and trust and distrust are evolved responses to sham emotions.  During a friendship where no sham emotions have been detected trust will build up. 
    and distrust and trust are evolved responses to sham emotions.  Having detected a sham the person will be distrusted.  

Guardian schematic strategies help support cooperation within
Peter Turchin describes how major pre-industrial empires developed due to effects of geographic boundaries constraining the empires and their neighbors' interactions.  Turchin shows how the asymmetries of breeding rates and resource growth rates results in dynamic cycles within cycles.  After the summary of Turchin's book complex adaptive system (CAS) theory is used to augment Turchins findings. 
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This page looks at schematic structures and their uses.  It discusses a number of examples:
  • Schematic ideas are recombined in creativity. 
  • Similarly designers take ideas and rules about materials and components and combine them. 
  • Schematic Recipes help to standardize operations. 
  • Modular components are combined into strategies for use in business plans and business models. 

As a working example it presents part of the contents and schematic details from the Adaptive Web Framework (AWF)'s operational plan. 

Finally it includes a section presenting our formal representation of schematic goals. 
Each goal has a series of associated complex adaptive system (CAS) strategy strings. 
These goals plus strings are detailed for various chess and business examples. 
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This page uses an example to illustrate how:
  • A business can gain focus from targeting key customers,
  • Business planning activities performed by the whole organization can build awareness, empowerment and coherence. 
  • A program approach can ensure strategic alignment. 
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